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Thursday, February 12, 2009

Object Repository Types

Object Repository Types
Test objects can be stored in two types of object repositories—a shared object repository and a local object repository.

A shared object repository stores test objects in a file that can be accessed by multiple tests (in read-only mode).

A local object repository stores objects in a file that is associated with one specific action, so that only that action can access the stored objects.

Local Object Repository

When you use a local object repository, QuickTest uses a separate object repository for each action.

  • QuickTest creates a new (empty) object repository for each action.
  • As you record operations on objects in your application, QuickTest automatically stores the information about those objects in the corresponding local object repository (if the objects do not already exist in an associated shared object repository).
    QuickTest adds all new objects to the local object repository even if one or more shared object repositories are already associated with the action. (This assumes that an object with the same description does not already exist in one of the associated shared object repositories).

  • If a child object is added to a local object repository, and its parents are in a shared object repository, its parents are automatically moved to the local object repository.
  • Every time you create a new action, QuickTest creates a new, corresponding local object repository and begins adding test objects to the local object repository as you record or learn objects.
  • If you learn or record on the same object in your application in two different actions, the object is stored as a separate test object in each of the local object repositories.
  • When you save your test, all of the local object repositories are automatically saved with the test (as part of each action within the test). The local object repository is not accessible as a separate file (unlike the shared object repository).
Shared Object Repository
When you use shared object repositories, QuickTest uses the shared object repositories you specify for the selected action. You can use one or more shared object repositories.
  • If you record operations on an object that already exists in either the shared or local object repository, QuickTest uses the existing information and does not add the object to the object repository.
  • If a child object is added to a local object repository, and its parents are in a shared object repository, its parents are automatically moved to the local object repository.
  • QuickTest does not add an object to the shared object repository as you record operations on it. Instead, it adds new objects to the local object repository (not the shared object repository) as you learn objects or record steps on them (unless those same objects already exist in an associated shared object repository).
  • You can export the local objects to a shared object repository.
You can also merge the local objects directly to a shared object repository that is associated with the same action. This can reduce maintenance since you can maintain the objects in a single shared location, instead of multiple locations.
Creating and managing shared object repositories will do using Object Repository Manager. This concept will come in Managing object repositories.



When to use Local object repository

  • You have only one, or very few, tests that correspond to a given application interface, or set of objects.
  • You do not expect to frequently modify test object properties.
  • You generally create single-action tests.
When to use shared object Repository

  • You are creating tests using keyword-driven methodologies (not using record).
  • You have several tests that test elements of the same application, interface, or set of objects.
  • You expect the object properties in your application to change from time to time and/or you regularly need to update or modify test object properties.
  • You often work with multi-action tests and regularly use the Insert Copy of Action and Insert Call to Action options.

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